Festival de Lanaudière : Les Violons du Roy & Lucienne Renaudin-Vary celebrate Haydn

Interview by Alexandre Villemaire
Genres and styles : Classical Period / classique

Additional Information

Les Violons du Roy will join acclaimed French trumpet player Lucienne Renaudin-Vary in a program featuring the music of composer Joseph Haydn. Whether it’s a coincidence of the calendar or a well-thought-out marketing coup by the festival, on this July 14th, it’s under the theme of Haydn in Paris that the performers will gather at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay. On the program: a selection of Haydn’s Paris symphonies, composed between 1785 and 1786, and the Trumpet Concerto in E-flat major. PAN M 360 spoke to Jonathan Cohen, musical director of Les Violons du Roy, about this concert.

PAN M 360 : What sparked the idea of this program around Haydn and his Parisian symphonies? 

Jonathan Cohen : It’s a little bit our idea and a little bit of conversation with Renaud Loranger in figuring  out a nice program for the summer. I’m so glad that we settled on this program. It’s rare that we can devote a whole program to Haydn.  It’s a wonderful thing because normally in big symphony concerts, Haydn’s music is always the opening number, or the symphony serves as a warm-up for something else. It’s a real joy to put the spotlight on Haydn with a whole program devoted to him. It’s a real joy. A real triumph, in fact.

PAN M 360 : There are six symphonies in total in this ensemble of Parisian symphonies. You will be playing a selection of three. What are the particularities of these symphonies?  

Jonathan Cohen : We wanted to make a nice selection and these are pieces we know well. In fact, the only piece I don’t think we’ve played before is Symphony No. 82 “The Bear”. There’s also a nice variety in the program. In Haydn’s music in general, there’s a bit of everything. He’s a master of contrast. There’s a lot of difference between the pieces and in the movements. For example, in “The Hen”, the slow movement is a little jewel, extremely precious and romantic, almost religious, whereas in “The Bear”, there’s a very martial character. And then you have these very fast final movements for which Haydn is famous, which require enormous technical ability on the part of the orchestra and a large number of musicians.

PAN M 360 : If I’m not mistaken, at the time, the size of the orchestra that is required was quite unusual, is it not? 

Jonathan Cohen : In different places the fashion was different. When Mozart wrote his Paris Symphony for example, his father told him that he should make it very loud because the French liked very loud, big manifestations of royal music and make it very grand, because that’s what they loved. In a world, which was not connected by the Internet, there was much more diversity, I think, between styles in cities and nations and orchestras. And everyone really had a slightly different angle.  I remember when I played a lot of Haydn when I was younger, I was in a group called the London Haydn Quartet. We did  programs of only Haydn’s music, and we found it quite amazing using different editions of the time. Each edition, whether in England, Vienna or Paris. Some would be very legato with lots of slurs everywhere, some other editions would be the same music in the same period of time. They were changed, adapted and edited. These Parisian Symphonies were edited by the chevalier de Saint-Georges, who conducted their creation. They would have made it their own.  It’s a nice thought that today we tend to think of “old music” a bit like a museum and what the composer wrote was a real fact of truth, when actually, at the time, people were adapting and making music really their own and was composed for particular people in different styles and much more flexible.

PAN M 360 : The unique concerto of the concert will  put French  trumpet player Lucienne Reanaudin-Vary on the foreground. Was it her choice to play this concerto, or was it a decision by you or Renaud Loranger to put that piece in the program?

Jonathan Cohen : It is a joint decision. Renaud wanted to invite Lucienne for a long time. She’s a very celebrated trumpet player from France and it will be my first time working with her. I’m really looking forward to it with this great concerto. It’s quite a late piece from Haydn that was first performed in 1800 when he was already an old man in his 60s. It was a time where the trumpet was really developing. It’s an interesting story because the trumpet didn’t used to have keys and valves. This was one of the first pieces, where Haydn is exploring the chromatic range in the middle register of the trumpet. It’s a mature piece of Haydn’s, a wonderful piece and maybe one of his most celebrated concertos. 

PAN M 360 : What do you like about Haydn’s music?
Jonathan Cohen : He’s one of my favorite composers because I think he’s a man that has a lot of goodwill and good nature in life.  He was also a great inventor. It’s hard to look back in history, but at the time when Haydn was writing, he was single-handedly creating a new type of music for orchestra by developing the symphony out of the concerto grosso. During his time composing for the Esterhazys he used the professional orchestra that he had at his disposal for experimenting. Like in a laboratory, he was inventing all the time. That’s why he’s known as the Father of the Symphony. He’s very pure; his music is positive, very creative and original, humorous and witty. He has an attachment to humanity. I think he really celebrates that in his music. That’s why I think it’s a nice program for summer as well. It is rejoicing.

PROGRAM

Haydn à Paris

Les Violons du Roy

Direction: Jonathan Cohen

Lucienne Renaudin-Vary, trompette

Les Violons du Roy will join acclaimed French trumpet player Lucienne Renaudin-Vary in a program featuring the music of composer Joseph Haydn. Whether it’s a coincidence of the calendar or a well-thought-out marketing coup by the festival, on this July 14th, it’s under the theme of Haydn in Paris that the performers will gather at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay. On the program: a selection of Haydn’s Paris symphonies, composed between 1785 and 1786, and the Trumpet Concerto in E-flat major. PAN M 360 spoke to Jonathan Cohen, musical director of Les Violons du Roy, about this concert.

PAN M 360 : What sparked the idea of this program around Haydn and his Parisian symphonies? 

Jonathan Cohen : It’s a little bit our idea and a little bit of conversation with Renaud Loranger in figuring  out a nice program for the summer. I’m so glad that we settled on this program. It’s rare that we can devote a whole program to Haydn.  It’s a wonderful thing because normally in big symphony concerts, Haydn’s music is always the opening number, or the symphony serves as a warm-up for something else. It’s a real joy to put the spotlight on Haydn with a whole program devoted to him. It’s a real joy. A real triumph, in fact.

PAN M 360 : There are six symphonies in total in this ensemble of Parisian symphonies. You will be playing a selection of three. What are the particularities of these symphonies?  

Jonathan Cohen : We wanted to make a nice selection and these are pieces we know well. In fact, the only piece I don’t think we’ve played before is Symphony No. 82 “The Bear”. There’s also a nice variety in the program. In Haydn’s music in general, there’s a bit of everything. He’s a master of contrast. There’s a lot of difference between the pieces and in the movements. For example, in “The Hen”, the slow movement is a little jewel, extremely precious and romantic, almost religious, whereas in “The Bear”, there’s a very martial character. And then you have these very fast final movements for which Haydn is famous, which require enormous technical ability on the part of the orchestra and a large number of musicians.

PAN M 360 : If I’m not mistaken, at the time, the size of the orchestra that is required was quite unusual, is it not? 

Jonathan Cohen : In different places the fashion was different. When Mozart wrote his Paris Symphony for example, his father told him that he should make it very loud because the French liked very loud, big manifestations of royal music and make it very grand, because that’s what they loved. In a world, which was not connected by the Internet, there was much more diversity, I think, between styles in cities and nations and orchestras. And everyone really had a slightly different angle.  I remember when I played a lot of Haydn when I was younger, I was in a group called the London Haydn Quartet. We did  programs of only Haydn’s music, and we found it quite amazing using different editions of the time. Each edition, whether in England, Vienna or Paris. Some would be very legato with lots of slurs everywhere, some other editions would be the same music in the same period of time. They were changed, adapted and edited. These Parisian Symphonies were edited by the chevalier de Saint-Georges, who conducted their creation. They would have made it their own.  It’s a nice thought that today we tend to think of “old music” a bit like a museum and what the composer wrote was a real fact of truth, when actually, at the time, people were adapting and making music really their own and was composed for particular people in different styles and much more flexible.

PAN M 360 : The unique concerto of the concert will  put French  trumpet player Lucienne Reanaudin-Vary on the foreground. Was it her choice to play this concerto, or was it a decision by you or Renaud Loranger to put that piece in the program?

Jonathan Cohen : It is a joint decision. Renaud wanted to invite Lucienne for a long time. She’s a very celebrated trumpet player from France and it will be my first time working with her. I’m really looking forward to it with this great concerto. It’s quite a late piece from Haydn that was first performed in 1800 when he was already an old man in his 60s. It was a time where the trumpet was really developing. It’s an interesting story because the trumpet didn’t used to have keys and valves. This was one of the first pieces, where Haydn is exploring the chromatic range in the middle register of the trumpet. It’s a mature piece of Haydn’s, a wonderful piece and maybe one of his most celebrated concertos. 

PAN M 360 : What do you like about Haydn’s music?
Jonathan Cohen : He’s one of my favorite composers because I think he’s a man that has a lot of goodwill and good nature in life.  He was also a great inventor. It’s hard to look back in history, but at the time when Haydn was writing, he was single-handedly creating a new type of music for orchestra by developing the symphony out of the concerto grosso. During his time composing for the Esterhazys he used the professional orchestra that he had at his disposal for experimenting. Like in a laboratory, he was inventing all the time. That’s why he’s known as the Father of the Symphony. He’s very pure; his music is positive, very creative and original, humorous and witty. He has an attachment to humanity. I think he really celebrates that in his music. That’s why I think it’s a nice program for summer as well. It is rejoicing.

PROGRAMME

Haydn à Paris

Les Violons du Roy

Direction: Jonathan Cohen

Lucienne Renaudin-Vary, trumpet

Symphony No. 83 in G minor, Hob. I : 83 “The Hen

Symphony no. 85 in B flat major, Hob. I: 85 “The Queen

Trumpet Concerto in E-flat major, Hob. VIIe/1

Symphony No. 82 in C major, Hob. I: 82 “The Bear

AU FESTIVAL DE LANAUDIÈRE, LES VIOLONS DU ROY PRÉSENTENT LE PROGRAMME HAYDN À PARIS, CE VENDREDI 14 JUILLET, 20H, AMPHITHÉÂTRE FERNAND LINDSAY


Achetez vos billets ici


Achetez vos billets ici

Latest 360 Content

PAN M 360 at Nuits d’Afrique – Luiz Salgado and his “caipira” guitar

PAN M 360 at Nuits d’Afrique – Luiz Salgado and his “caipira” guitar

PAN M 360 at Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | Bombino: human warmth with the beat of the desert

PAN M 360 at Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | Bombino: human warmth with the beat of the desert

Domaine Forget 2024 | Cape Verdean breezes in Charlevoix with Lucibela

Domaine Forget 2024 | Cape Verdean breezes in Charlevoix with Lucibela

Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | ALBERTO SALGADO: Embracing Brazilian Traditions and Modernity 

Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | ALBERTO SALGADO: Embracing Brazilian Traditions and Modernity 

Truck Violence Burns It Down and Starts Again

Truck Violence Burns It Down and Starts Again

PAN M 360 aux Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | Plus qu’un “fils de”… voici Kirá!

PAN M 360 aux Nuits d’Afrique 2024 | Plus qu’un “fils de”… voici Kirá!

Jowee Omicil invites the liberating spirits of Bwa Kayman

Jowee Omicil invites the liberating spirits of Bwa Kayman

Dobet Gnahoré: an angel comes and stays

Dobet Gnahoré: an angel comes and stays

Baltra at Piknic Electronik | From lo-fi house to now

Baltra at Piknic Electronik | From lo-fi house to now

Jaeden Izik-Dzurko: A look back at the CMIM and a glance forward

Jaeden Izik-Dzurko: A look back at the CMIM and a glance forward

Love Heart Cheat Code, new push from Hiatus Kaiyote

Love Heart Cheat Code, new push from Hiatus Kaiyote

Suoni  | Sick of Fun

Suoni  | Sick of Fun

Suoni per il popolo | The socially committed and fiery jazz of Irreversible Entanglements

Suoni per il popolo | The socially committed and fiery jazz of Irreversible Entanglements

JAKŌ and his experimental soundscapes at Suoni

JAKŌ and his experimental soundscapes at Suoni

Ishi Tishi and their Evening With All The Animals at Suoni

Ishi Tishi and their Evening With All The Animals at Suoni

Suoni per il popolo | A chat with a contemporary music legend: Howard Skempton

Suoni per il popolo | A chat with a contemporary music legend: Howard Skempton

Habitat Sonore at Centre Phi| Summer playlist and ideal venue for active, immersive listening

Habitat Sonore at Centre Phi| Summer playlist and ideal venue for active, immersive listening

Piknic Électronik | Pretty Privilege is aiming joy and sassiness

Piknic Électronik | Pretty Privilege is aiming joy and sassiness

Suoni | Sarah Davachi and the idea of being played by No Hay Banda

Suoni | Sarah Davachi and the idea of being played by No Hay Banda

Suoni Per Il Popolo | The Jellicle Kiki Ball

Suoni Per Il Popolo | The Jellicle Kiki Ball

Phi Centre | KALLITECHNIS is about sensuality and introspection

Phi Centre | KALLITECHNIS is about sensuality and introspection

Montréal Baroque Fest 2024 : discover the ‘’Multiverse’’ programming

Montréal Baroque Fest 2024 : discover the ‘’Multiverse’’ programming

L’Orchestre de l’Agora, Natasha Kanapé Fontaine, Claudie Bertounesque, Richard Strauss, Élizabeth St-Gelais | Nicolas Ellis explains the Gala de la Terre

L’Orchestre de l’Agora, Natasha Kanapé Fontaine, Claudie Bertounesque, Richard Strauss, Élizabeth St-Gelais | Nicolas Ellis explains the Gala de la Terre

Bell Orchestre becomes immersive and interactive, House Music becomes Sound House at SAT

Bell Orchestre becomes immersive and interactive, House Music becomes Sound House at SAT

Subscribe to our newsletter